Tuesday

Pearl Harbor - December 7, 1941

December 7, 1941

In the early 1940s, before America was destroyed from within by the leftist fifth column, the United States government commissioned some of the best filmmakers to create propaganda in support of the war effort. The works of the most famous of those directors, John Ford, John Huston, Frank Capra, and William Wyler, are the subjects of this collection.

In contrast to today's environment (where many politicians think of Hollywood as the devil and most contemporary political cinema targets the government as irrational and inequitable) in the 1940s, everyone appeared to be on the same side. The films in this collection are examples of Cinemocracy, the relationship between motion pictures and government.



"December 7th," directed by John Ford, begins with the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, nicknamed "the Navy's hundred million dollar fist." Authentic footage of the invasion is mixed with reenactments to provide a complete portrait of the events of that fateful day.

An extended sequence pays tribute to the American soldiers killed in the attack, many of whom are individually profiled, complete with testimonials offered by surviving family members. American bravery is not only embodied by the fallen, it is proven by the resolve that comes in response to the attack.

The film culminates in a profile of the Navy's recovery of one sunken vessel in particular, employing the effort as a metaphor for the American cause, "a symbol of the fighting spirit of our men who build and man our ships." Much like this successful refitting, the film suggests that American forces will rise from destruction, stronger than they were before.

Lift Up America... Again!!!

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